Intratympanic steroids shot is it worth it

As of July 2012, a visit to the National Library of Medicine’s search engine, PubMed, revealed 497 research articles concerning AIED disease published since 1964 with eleven of these published in the last year. In spite of this moderate effort by the medical research community, AIED disease remains a chronic, incurable disorder that causes progressive disability to both hearing and balance. At the American Hearing Research Foundation (AHRF) , we have funded basic research on similar disorders in the past , and are interested in funding research on AIED in the future. We are particularly interested in projects that might lead to methods of stopping progression of hearing loss and the disabling attacks of dizziness. Get more information about contributing to the AHRF’s efforts to detect and treat acoustic neuroma.

I have gotten very substantial relief from my symptoms (especially vertigo) from using a combination of a low sodium diet, Betahistine and Valacyclovir. I take 24 mg. of Betahistine daily (8 mg. three times per day) and 1000 mg. of Valacyclovir daily (500 mg. two times per day). I have followed this routine for well over a year and I’ve had very good results, without a single vertigo attack in this period. I have never experienced any side effects from either Betahistine or Valacyclovir. Betahistine is expensive and generally not covered by health insurance since it’s not FDA approved and you have to buy it at a compounding pharmacy. However, I found it to be well worth the cost. You may want to discuss this approach with your ENT and give it a try. The combination of a low sodium diet and these two medications helped me get my life back. I hope this is helpful.

In extremely severe cases, treatments that deaden the inner ear such as gentamicin injections or surgery may be considered. This is a last resort for persons who have severe attacks which are disabling. At present, we favor gentamicin for most instances where destructive treatments are being considered. Injections of gentamicin are given through the ear drum, through a small hole or through a small tube. This procedure allows the doctor to treat one side alone, without affecting the other. Typically, about four injections are given over a period of one month. Some authors have reported improvements in 60 to 90 percent of patients with gentamicin (Driscoll et al., 2009; Bodmer, 2007; Boleas-Aguirre, 2007; Chung, 2007), and Chung reported equally effective results with a single injection compared to multiple injections (Chung, 2007). Dizziness may reoccur one year later, requiring another series. Gentamicin injection can also result in hearing loss (Silvertein 2009; Colletti, 2007).

The remaining two procedures, vetibular neurectomy and labyrinthectomy, are ways of eliminating the balance function of the faulty ear. It is known that individuals will function better with one normal balance system than with one normal and one faulty system. The labyrinthectomy is a procedure in which the mastoid bone is removed and the inner ear is eliminated. This procedure is for patients that have lost usable hearing in the affected ear, as it entails removing all function of the inner ear, including hearing and balance. The change from having two balance systems to having one balance system alone does require a recovery or "compensation" period. It takes the brain a period of weeks to figure out that only one system is active and that it is no longer receiving information from the faulty system which it had come to expect. The second procedure, the vestibular neurectomy, is a good option if the hearing is good in the ear with the failing balance system. In this surgical procedure, the balance nerve (vestibular nerve) is cut between the inner ear and the brain. The inner ear is completely preserved but the faulty balance information is not able to reach the brain and cause the vertigo. Like the labyrinthectomy, this procedure requires a recovery period while the brain "figures out" the new situation.

Intratympanic steroids shot is it worth it

intratympanic steroids shot is it worth it

The remaining two procedures, vetibular neurectomy and labyrinthectomy, are ways of eliminating the balance function of the faulty ear. It is known that individuals will function better with one normal balance system than with one normal and one faulty system. The labyrinthectomy is a procedure in which the mastoid bone is removed and the inner ear is eliminated. This procedure is for patients that have lost usable hearing in the affected ear, as it entails removing all function of the inner ear, including hearing and balance. The change from having two balance systems to having one balance system alone does require a recovery or "compensation" period. It takes the brain a period of weeks to figure out that only one system is active and that it is no longer receiving information from the faulty system which it had come to expect. The second procedure, the vestibular neurectomy, is a good option if the hearing is good in the ear with the failing balance system. In this surgical procedure, the balance nerve (vestibular nerve) is cut between the inner ear and the brain. The inner ear is completely preserved but the faulty balance information is not able to reach the brain and cause the vertigo. Like the labyrinthectomy, this procedure requires a recovery period while the brain "figures out" the new situation.

Media:

intratympanic steroids shot is it worth itintratympanic steroids shot is it worth itintratympanic steroids shot is it worth itintratympanic steroids shot is it worth itintratympanic steroids shot is it worth it

http://buy-steroids.org