Corticosteroid mechanism in asthma

Intravenous corticosteroids are sometimes needed in patients who need aggressive management of the inflammation, as in a patient with optic nerve involvement, severe VKH, sympathetic ophthalmia, serpiginous choroiditis or in case of panuveitis. The most commonly used drug is methylprednisolone. The usual dosage is 500 mg to 1 gm intravenous infusion with % normal saline or sodium lactate solution over 30 to 60 minutes daily for 3 consecutive days, followed by high dose of oral corticosteroids. Caution should be taken as intravenous methylprednisolone can cause cardiac arrhythmias and cardiovascular collapse. Intravenous methylprednisolone should be followed by high dose oral steroid or immunosuppressive agent

Anti-Inflammatory Properties
The inflammatory process is controlled by the glucocorticoids’ activity, enhancing the transcription of anti-inflammatory genes and decreasing the transcription of inflammatory genes (Figure 3 ) [ 15 ].
Glucocorticoids induce the expression of annexin A1 (also known as lipocortin 1; encoded by ANXA 1) and ALXR (the annexin A1 receptor) by mechanisms still not known. Annexin A1 is a protein mainly located on basal keratinocytes of the basement membrane. Although in normal skin annexin A1 has been identified within cytoplasm, in diseased skin the intracellular localization of annexin A1 is apparently modified. In lesional psoriatic skin, annexin A1 appears only in the cell membrane, suggesting a translocation of the protein. This transition may occur to promote the binding of annexin A1 to phospholipids, therefore reducing the production of inflammatory prostanoids [ 37 ].
Annexin A1 inhibits phospholipase A 2 (PLA 2 ), thus blocking the synthesis of arachidonate-derived eicosanoids (prostaglandins, prostacyclins, leukotrienes, and thromboxanes) [ 32 ]. This blocking is furthered by the repression of glucocorticoid-mediated cyclooxygenase 2 transcription [ 38 – 41 ]. It remains unclear if the reduction of these substances levels come first and then plaque resolution, or if the normalization of prostanoid levels follows plaque clearance [ 37 ].
Exogenous and endogenous annexin A1 may regulate the innate immune cells activities controlling its levels of activation. Annexin A1 signals throw a formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPR2, ALXR in humans). Despite the activation of ALXR singnalling can occur by the annexin A1 autocrine, paracrine, and juxtacrine functions, the juxtacrine interaction seems to be the mechanism by which the anti-inflammatory process occurs. Concerning the innate response, it seems that the upregulation of the annexin A1 expression by leukocytes induced by glucocorticoids may be responsible for the inhibition of leukocytes response. Glucocorticoids also increase the secretion of annexin A1 by macrophages and the annexin A1 secreted by mast cells and monocytes, promotes the clearance of apoptotic neutrophils by macrophages. Endogenous annexin A1 is also released from apoptotic neutrophils and acts on macrophages promoting phagocytosis and removal of the apoptotic cells. The ALXR may be one mediator of this mechanism. Contrasting with the innate immunity, the adaptive immune system seems to act in a different way. Activation of T cells results in the release of annexin A1 and in the expression of ALXR. Although, glicocorticoids may reduce the annexin A1 expression within T-cell exposure as a consequence, there is an inhibition of T-cell activation and T cells differentiate into T helper 2 [ 42 , 43 ].

Differentiation Syndrome: See Boxed WARNING. In the clinical trial, 14% of patients treated with IDHIFA experienced differentiation syndrome. Differentiation syndrome has been observed with and without concomitant hyperleukocytosis, as early as 10 days and at up to 5 months after IDHIFA initiation. If differentiation syndrome is suspected, initiate systemic corticosteroids and hemodynamic monitoring until improvement. Taper corticosteroids only after resolution of symptoms. Differentiation syndrome symptoms may recur with premature discontinuation of corticosteroids. If severe pulmonary symptoms requiring intubation or ventilator support and/or renal dysfunction persist for more than 48 hours after initiation of corticosteroids, interrupt IDHIFA until signs and symptoms are no longer severe. Hospitalization for close observation and monitoring of patients with pulmonary and/or renal manifestation is recommended.

Desonate was approved by the FDA following two major clinical trials in 2006. Each randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study enrolled 582 pediatric patients (between the ages of 3 months and 18 years). [9] The patient was topically administered the drug or placebo two times a day for four weeks. Using the Investigator’s Global Severity Score (IGSS), the treatment was considered successful if at Week 4 there was at least a two (2) point decrease from the patient’s baseline IGSS. In clinical trial 1, 44% of patients succeeded successful treatment of Desonate versus 14% treated with the placebo. In clinical trial 2, 28% of patients succeeded successful treatment of Desonate versus 6% treated with the placebo.

Alendronate (Fosamax), risedronate (Actonel), zoledronic acid (Reclast), and raloxifene (Evista) have an indication from the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) for the prevention of osteoporosis (such as for those with osteopenia), as well as for the treatment of osteoporosis. For raloxifene (Evista) and risedronate (Actonel), the doses used for osteopenia are the same as those used for osteoporosis. Zoledronic acid (Reclast) is an intravenous medication given yearly for the treatment of osteoporosis but every other year for the prevention of osteoporosis. Alendronate (Fosamax) is given as 10 mg daily or 70 mg weekly for osteoporosis, and the dose is halved for the prevention of osteoporosis (5 mg daily or 35 mg weekly).

Corticosteroid mechanism in asthma

corticosteroid mechanism in asthma

Desonate was approved by the FDA following two major clinical trials in 2006. Each randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study enrolled 582 pediatric patients (between the ages of 3 months and 18 years). [9] The patient was topically administered the drug or placebo two times a day for four weeks. Using the Investigator’s Global Severity Score (IGSS), the treatment was considered successful if at Week 4 there was at least a two (2) point decrease from the patient’s baseline IGSS. In clinical trial 1, 44% of patients succeeded successful treatment of Desonate versus 14% treated with the placebo. In clinical trial 2, 28% of patients succeeded successful treatment of Desonate versus 6% treated with the placebo.

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